Category Archives: Literature review

when we read something

Mori’s uncanny valley: when humanoid robots become too human, and thus scary

Mori’s original hypothesis states that as the appearance of a robot is made more human, a human observer’s emotional response to the robot will become increasingly positive and empathic, until a point is reached beyond which the response quickly becomes that … Continue reading

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Brain-Robot Interfaces: using brain-robot interfaces for controlling implicit social patterns

Several emerging computer devices read bio-electrical signals (e.g., electro-corticographic signals, skin biopotential or facial muscle tension) and translate them into computer-understandable input. We investigated how one low-cost commercially-available device could be used to control a domestic robot. First, we used … Continue reading

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Robots are co-evolving with us

What does it mean to take the gray wolf home? The domestication of the dog began thousands of years ago. It still continues with cross-breeding dogs to create so called “designer dogs” or “hybrid dogs”. Can we transfer the evolution … Continue reading

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4 categories to envision our relationships with robots

According to Kaplan (2005), people envision robots from 3 points of view: usefulness (is the robot doing something useful), affective (could the robot user any affective relationship with its robot), intellectual (would the robot lead to an even more blurred … Continue reading

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Difficult to imagine bonding with a machine

The following remark from Kaplan matches very well with our first field learnings about people’s perceptions of robots. “The idea of a robot for leisure, the idea of a machine that would not be useful, … which only function would … Continue reading

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Inquiétante étrangeté

Talking about first encounterings with prototypes of the Sony dog robot Aibo « l’inquiétante étrangeté (unheimlich-the scary strangeness), according to Freud, we were feeling that impression that one thing that we were believing was unanimated was suddenly animating itself. By its … Continue reading

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Should robots be inspired by nature?

In contradiction to the myth, it is very rarely by « copying » the nature that one conceives new machines. Planes are not directly modelised birds, like computers have not been constructed like human brains. Technical inventions follow its own rules : it … Continue reading

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